Knudson APD-101 - History

Knudson APD-101 - History


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Knudson

Milton Lox Knudson, born 20 October 1923 in Geneva, Ill., enlisted in the Navy 1 July 1941. While serving in Laffey (DD-459) in the Southwest Pacific he distinguished himself 15 September 1942 during rescue operations for survivors of the torpedoed Wasp (CV-7). With "courageous disregard" for his personal safety, he dived over the side of his ship and swam considerable distances with lines to rescue the stricken carrier's exhausted sailors, thus saving the lives of many who otherwise might have perished. During the heroic night naval action off Guadalcanal 13 November Seaman First Class Knudson was killed when Laffey was sunk by Japanese torpedoes and gunfire. He was posthumously awarded the Navy and Marine Corps Medal for his valor.

(APD-101: dp. 1,390; 1. 306'; b. 37'; 12'7"; s. 24 k.; cpl. 204; a. 15", 6 40mm., 6 20mm., 2 dct.; cl. Crosley)

Knudson (DE-591) was laid down 23 December 1943 by Bethlehem-Hingham Shipyards, Inc., Hingham, Mass.; launched 5 February 1944; sponsored by Mrs. Emmons R. Knudson; reclassified APD_101 on 17 July; and com- missioned 25 November, Lt. Dudley C. Sharp in command.

After shakedown, Knudson departed Norfolk 18 January 1945 for the Pacific. Steaming via San Diego, the highspeed transport arrived Pearl Harbor 9 February for training with UDT units. With UDT 19 embarked, she departed Pearl 28 February, steamed via Eniwetok, and arrived Ulithi 12 March to prepare for operations in the Ryukyus. Clearing Ulithi 21 March for operations off Kerama Retto, she supported UDT 19 during reconnaissance and demolition operations on Kuba, Aka, Keise, and Geruma Shima from 25 March to 30 March. While serving as antisubmarine screen 26 March, she was attacked by an enemy bomber. Her guns splashed the plane after two bombs had missed her close aboard. On 1 April she continued ASW patrols during amphibious landings at Hagushi, Okinawa. During the next 2 weeks she conducted screening patrols off the western shores of Okinawa. Then she sailed 14 April for Guam escorting Nevada (BB-36), arriving 19 April. She proceeded to Ulithi 23 April, debarked UDT 19 on the 25th, and departed 5 May for Okinawa escorting Portland (CA-33). Reaching Okinawa 8 May, she resumed screening duty and helped repel enemy air attacks until 15 June when she departed Hagushi Anchorage for Leyte.

Arriving 18 June, Knudson operated in the northern Philippines until 4 July. She departed Subic Bay as escort for an Okinawa-bound, LST convoy, reaching Guam 16 July. After embarking UDT 19, she sailed 19 July for the West Coast via Eniwetok and Pearl Harbor, arriving San Diego 5 August. Knudson embarked UDT 25 on 13 August, departed 16 August for the Far East, and arrived

Tokyo Bay, Japan, 4 September. She operated out of Yokosuka until 20 September when she returned to the United States, arriving San Diego 11 October. She continued her service in the Pacific from 30 October to 12 May 1946, carrying men and supplies to bases in the Marshalls Marianas, Admiralties, and Philippines. Departing Manila Bay 20 April with homebound veterans embarked, she arrived San Pedro 12 May. Knudson decommissioned 4 November and entered the San Diego Group, Pacific Reserve Fleet, 15 November.

Knudson recommissioned 6 August 1953, Lt. Comdr. J. F. Roohan, Jr., in command. After shakedown and conversion to an APD Flagship, she departed San Diego 3 May 1954 for the Western Pacific. Arriving Yokosuka 23 May, she conducted amphibious exercises off Japan, South Korea, and Okinawa. Clearing Tokyo Bay 13 August, she sailed for the Vietnamese coast, where she
arrived Haiphong, North Vietnam, 22 August. As flagship for the Commander, Embarkation Group, she participated in Operation "Passage to Freedom," through which the Navy evacuated almost 300,000 Vietnamese from North to South Vietnam. From 22 August to 19 September, she operated out of Haiphong during the loading of refugees, cargo, and military equipment by Navy ships. Then she steamed to Saigon, South Vietnam, arriving 22 September. Continuing to Subic Bay 2 October, she returned to Yokosuka via Hong Kong 1 November. And on 7 November she sailed for the United States s, arriving San Diego 23 November.

Knudson operated out of San Diego and Long Beach supporting amphibious training during 1955 and early 1956. Departing Long Beach 24 March 1956, she steamed via Pearl Harbor to Eniwetok where she arrived 10 April. Until returning to Pearl 23 July, she supported nuclear tests in the Marshall Islands. She returned Long Beach 6 August and resumed amphibious, UDT, and ASW training operations. After sailing to San Francisco 27 September, Knudson decommissioned 2 January 1958 and joined the Stockton Group, Pacific Reserve Meet, later to transfer to the Texas Group, where she remains.

Knudson received one battle star for World War II service.


Morrison-Knudsen Locomotives

The Morrison-Knudsen Corporation was not normally associated with the railroad industry.  For years the company, based in Idaho, had been involved in construction and engineering where it made its fortunes after being incorporated during the early 20th century.  It was only during the early 1970s that M-K began rebuilding locomotives through a new subsidiary and over the years it became more well-known for the quality of its work, outshopping hundreds of Electro-Motive products, and those of other builders, that even sported a custom paint scheme.  During the late 1980s under the direction of an ambitious CEO, M-K began branching out into the light-rail transit/commuter rail market with the hope of manufacturing passenger cars and even locomotives intended for freight service.  

However, these efforts fell apart resulting in the CEO ousted, the company falling into bankruptcy, and eventually being dissolved after it was acquired by another corporation.  The company's fate is truly unfortunate considering it was a successful locomotive re-builder which many railroads and organizations turned to  by extending the service lives of units which would have otherwise been scrapped.

Three Wabash Valley units, GP7u's #4301 and #4302 along with SW1 #1802 are seen here laying over in the yard at Decatur, Illinois on January 3, 1981. All three wear M-K's early livery. Doug Kroll photo.

For much of its time as an operating business the name Morrison-Knudsen described a company in the civil engineering and construction field.  It began as a collaboration between Harry Morrison and Morris Knudsen in 1905 both of which had years of experience in the construction industry.  Their first contract did not generate much income but as they slowly improved their craft, soon their company was involved in numerous projects such as dams (notably the Hoover Dam), military projects during World War II, roads, and even new railroad lines.  Morrison-Knudsen entered the engineering field when it formed International Engineering Company, Inc. after 1950 to aid in the completion of public works projects outside of the United States.

More Reading.

When William H. McMurren became M-K's president and CEO in 1970 the company finally entered the railroad business, opening the Rail Systems Group (RSG) subsidiary in Boise, Idaho during 1972.  Under McMurren's direction Morrison-Knudsen saw significant growth where it branched out into several other fields such as mining, real estate, manufacturing, and shipbuilding.  Its RSG division worked quietly throughout the 1970s and 1980s rebuilding locomotives for prolonged service, mostly sticking with Electro-Motive equipment such as first and second-generation General Purpose models.  During this time Morrison-Knudsen also briefly got into the actual railroad business, operating the Wabash Valley Railroad from � through 1981.

Morrison-Knudsen rebuilt everything from Alco's to early EMD products. Here is Detroit & Mackinac RS-3u #974 at Bay City, Michigan on Sept. 9, 1979. The unit began its career as Boston & Maine RS3 #1512 in October, 1954 M-K listed it as model TE56-4A. Doug Kroll photo.

The WV used rebuilt M-K Geeps and operated a former Pennsylvania Railroad branch between Decatur and Paris, Illinois.  It gave up after state funding disappeared and another new startup also quite running the line after a few years (it was abandoned in 1984).  During its years of rebuilding locomotives RSG earned quite a reputation for the quality of its work outshopping everything from GP7s, GP40s, and U30Bs to SD40s, SD40-2s, SD45s, and C30-7s (even a few late-model Alcos were rebuilt) that could be seen all across the country.  One could easily distinguish their equipment, which featured a unique yellow and black paint scheme with a large, stylized "MK" on the long hood and accompanying wide pinstripe (later, the livery was changed to a deep blue with a gold pinstripe and "Morrison-Kudsen" spelled out on the hood).

One of Morrison-Knudsen's C425 rebuilds, #6101 (ex-PRR #2423), is seen here at the former Erie shops in Hornell, New York on August 28, 1987. Arnold Morscher photo.

M-K also added their own builder plate to every locomotive completed in Boise, which featured the company's classic "MKC" logo.  After 1988 the company was headed by William J. Agee, which had his share of successes in the business world but also a number of spectacular failures as well.  Among other endeavors, Agee felt that M-K's future lay in the railroad industry by expanding its locomotive rebuild division into full-scale production of new models.  Additionally, he believed that the United States was bound for a resurgence in passenger rail travel.  To this end he correctly read the market as light-rail and commuter transit began growing during the late 1980s through the 1990s.  To capture this opportunity the new CEO wanted Morrison-Knudsen to setup a rail car manufacturing facility using the old Pullman freight car plant on Chicago's far south side at 130th Street.

The new operation would supply locally operated Metra and other commuter rail services around the country with new cars.  Aside from this venture M-K won contracts for a number of LRT projects such as (among others) the Bay Area Rapid Transit in California, Washington D.C.'s Metro subway system, and a new service connecting Honolulu, Hawaii.  During 1992 M-K announced that it would also enter the locomotive production market via new subsidiary MK Rail Corporation using Caterpillar engines to power a monstrous 5,000 horsepower model known as the MK5000C.  Things seemingly could not be better for Morrison-Knudsen as Agee appeared to have the company on a solid and successful road to the future.  In the October 1992 issue of Trains਍on Phillips wrote a four-page cover story on M-K's growing success in the railroad industry, "Morrison-Knudsen's Big Gamble:  Is Bill Agee Destined For Railroad Greatness, Or Is He Just a Flash In The Pan?" ਏor a moreꃞtailed history of Morrison-Knudsen please਌lick here.

New Mexico Rail Runner MP36 #103 is seen here at Los Lunas, New Mexico. The locomotive is a product of Motive Power, M-K's successor. Doug Kroll photo.

Unfortunately, the title of this piece turned out to be an impending omen as Agee and M-K really were just a flash in the pan.  The company extended itself too far, too quickly and did not have the infrastructure in place to complete its rail car contracts.  Additionally, a number of its LRT and high-speed rail contracts died when public funding for the projects fell through.  By 1994 Morrison-Knudsen announced it had lost more than $300 million for the year and with creditors threatening to shut off funding Agee was ousted during February of 1995.  After entering bankruptcy and being acquired by the Washington Construction Group, Inc. the former MK Rail division was spun-off as a separate company known as MotivePower Industries Corporation.  Today, the facility in Boise is still in the railroad business, known as MotivePower, Inc. and is primarily focuses on manufacturing low-emissions switchers and new commuter locomotives. 


Knudson APD-101 - History

Much of the historic data presented on the site would not have been possible without the assistance of noted DE historian Anne McCarthy. Anne was dedicated to preserving the history of the Destroyer Escort and publishing historically correct information. She was a frequent contributor to DESANews. She used m any resources and her information has been cross-referenced. Over 35 years of research was conducted to gather this in-depth up-to-date information. DESA mourns the sudden loss of Anne on 16 November 2006.

Pat Perrella, USS SLATER DE 766 volunteer curator, has contributed much historical information and photographs to this site. Her research is ongoing and will be presented on this site as well as in DESANews.

Pat works closely with the DESA webmaster and is to be commended for her dedication to preserving the memory of the destroyer escort.

I nformation provided by these researchers is correct to the best of the webmaster's knowledge. I am aware that there is information on the Internet that differs from th e researcher's information. Corrections are welcome in an effort to present the most accurate information available. Corrections should be sent to the webmaster along with complete documentation of the resource for the information.


Your webmaster issued a call for help and DESA members responded in their usual dedicated caring way. The following members have volunteered to transcribe documents for this web site and their work is ongoing.

We owe them a well deserved Thank You for helping to keep the memories alive. Well Done!

Michael Langone - USS Tinsman DE 589

Anne McCarthy - DE Historian (1933-2006)

Jim Mitchell - USS Roche DE 197

James Moore - EM2/c USS Kirkpatrick DER 318 and USS Van Voorhis DE
1028. DER 318 Dec 1958 - Jun 1960, DE 1028 Jun 1960 - Apr 1962

Pat Perrella - wife of Frank Edward Perrella S1/C USNR, USS Thomas J. Gary
DE-326 Nov 1945 - Aug 1946

Tony Polozzolo - USS Whitman DE 24

Robert Regan - RM2/c USS Neal A. Scott DE 769, Plankowner, July 1944-46

Wayne Reynolds - USS Knudson (DE 591) APD 101

Harold Roth - GM2/c USS Tomich DE 242, Plankowner, July 1943 - Jan 1946


Service history

First period in commission, 1944-1946

World War II

After shakedown, Knudson departed Norfolk, Virginia on 18 January 1945 for World War II service in the Pacific. Steaming via San Diego, California, she arrived at Pearl Harbor, Territory of Hawaii, on 9 February 1945 for training with underwater demolition team units. With Underwater Demolition Team 19 embarked, she departed Pearl Harbor on 28 February 1945, stopped at Eniwetok, and arrived at Ulithi Atoll on 12 March 1945 to prepare for operations in the Ryukyu Islands.

Clearing Ulithi Atoll on 21 March 1945 for operations off Kerama Retto, Knudson supported Underwater Demolition Team 19 during reconnaissance and demolition operations on Kuba Shima, Aka Shima, Keise Shima, and Geruma Shima from 25 March 1945 to 30 March 1945. While serving as antisubmarine screen on 26 March 1945, she was attacked by a Japanese bomber. Her guns shot the plane down after two bombs had missed her close aboard.

On 1 April 1945, the day that the initial amphibious landings on Okinawa took place, Knudson continued antisubmarine warfare patrols during amphibious landings at Hagushi, Okinawa. During the next two weeks she conducted screening patrols off the western shores of Okinawa in support of the Okinawa campaign.

Knudson departed Okinawan waters on 14 April 1945, escorting the battleship USS Nevada (BB-36) to Guam, arriving there on 19 April 1945. She then proceeded to Ulithi Atoll on 23 April 1945, debarked Underwater Demolition Team 19 on 25 April 1945, and departed Ulithi on 5 May 1945 for Okinawa escorting the heavy cruiser USS Portland (CA-33).

Reaching Okinawa on 8 May 1945, she resumed screening duty and helped repel Japanese air attacks until 15 June 1945, when she departed Hagushi Anchorage for Leyte in the Philippines.

Arriving at Leyte on 18 June 1945, Knudson operated in the northern Philippines until 4 July 1945. She departed Subic Bay, Luzon, as escort for an Okinawa-bound tank landing ship (LST) convoy, reaching Guam on 16 July 1945. After embarking Underwater Demolition Team 19, she departed Guam on 19 July 1945 and called at Eniwetok and Pearl Harbor before proceeding to the United States West Coast, arriving at San Diego on 5 August 1945. Knudson embarked Underwater Demolition Team 25 on 13 August 1945. World War II ended with the surrender of Japan the next day, 14 August 1945, which was 15 August 1945 across the International Date Line in East Asia.

Postwar

Knudson departed San Diego on 16 August 1945 for the Far East, and arrived in Tokyo Bay, Japan, on 4 September 1945. She operated out of Yokosuka, Japan, until 20 September 1945, when she returned to the United States, arriving at San Diego on 11 October 1945.

Knudson continued her service in the Pacific from 30 October 1945 to 12 May 1946, carrying men and supplies to bases in the Marshall Islands, Mariana Islands, Admiralty Islands, and Philippines.

Departing Manila Bay, Luzon, on 20 April 1946 with homebound veterans embarked, Knudson arrived at San Pedro, California, on 12 May 1946. She was decommissioned on 4 November 1946 and entered the San Diego Group, Pacific Reserve Fleet, on 15 November 1946.

Second period in commission, 1953-1958

Knudson recommissioned on 6 August 1953 with Lieutenant Commander J. F. Roohan, Jr., in command. After shakedown and conversion to a high-speed transport flagship, she departed San Diego on 3 May 1954 for the Western Pacific. Arriving at Yokosuka, Japan, on 23 May 1954, she conducted amphibious exercises off Japan, South Korea, and Okinawa.

Clearing Tokyo Bay on 13 August 1954, she set course for the Vietnamese coast, where she arrived at Haiphong, North Vietnam, on 22 August 1954. As flagship for the Commander, Embarkation Group, she participated in Operation Passage to Freedom, through which the U.S. Navy evacuated almost 300,000 Vietnamese from North Vietnam to South Vietnam. From 22 August 1954 to 19 September 1954, she operated out of Haiphong during the loading of refugees, cargo, and military equipment by U.S. Navy ships. Then she steamed to Saigon, South Vietnam, arriving on 22 September 1954.

Continuing to Subic Bay in the Philippines on 2 October 1954, she stopped at Hong Kong before returning to Yokosuka on 1 November 1954. On 7 November 1954 she departed Yokosuka for the United States, arriving at San Diego on 23 November 1954.

Knudson operated out of San Diego and Long Beach, California, supporting amphibious training during 1955 and early 1956.

Departing Long Beach on 24 March 1956, Knudson steamed via Pearl Harbor to Eniwetok, where she arrived on 10 April 1956. She supported nuclear tests in the Marshall Islands before returning to Pearl Harbor on 23 July 1956. She returned to Long Beach on 6 August 1956 and resumed amphibious, underwater demolition team, and antisubmarine warfare training operations. She then moved to San Francisco, California, on 27 September 1956.


Knudson APD-101 - History

This USS Knudson APD-101 License Plate Frame is proudly made in the USA at our facilities in Scottsboro, Alabama. Each of our MilitaryBest U.S. Navy Frames feature top and bottom Poly Coated Aluminum strips that are printed using sublimation which gives these quality automobile military frames a beautiful high gloss finish.

Please check your state and local regulations for compatibility of these Navy Frames for use on your vehicle.

A percentage of the sale of each MilitaryBest item is forwarded to the licensing departments of each respective branch of service in support of the MWR (Morale, Welfare, & Recreation) program. These payments are made by either ALL4U LLC or the wholesaler from where the item originated. Our team thanks you for your service and your support of these programs.

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About KNUDSEN

KNUDSEN, is located in Canada and has been designing and building echosounders for most of its existence. Starting in the late 1980’s with the 320A, designed for helicopter surveys in the high Arctic, and continuing with the 320M, 320B and their derivatives, KNUDSEN echosounders are now used in more than 70 countries around the world. Known for their pioneering use of digital signal processing (DSP) technology, KNUDSEN sounders are used in a wide range of applications, from shallow-water hydrographic survey to full-ocean depth scientific research.

Our Strengths

A key strength of KNUDSEN is the complementary alliance of partners Donald Knudsen, President, and Judith Knudsen, V.P. Operations / Marketing – both of whom understand the importance of product innovation and customer satisfaction. President Donald Knudsen is the driving force behind the company’s technical team. Don gained early field experience as a senior engineer at the Canada Centre for Remote Sensing, where he was involved with the development of a variety of systems for airborne remote sensing. Previously, he worked at the Canadian Hydrographic Service, where he learned about sonar and signal processing, and survey technology. As Judith observes, “In this business there is no substitute for field experience.”

Donald Knudsen has also been acknowledged for his work in the field of digital beamforming technology, for which he received Canada’s highest award for innovation, the Manning Foundation Award of Distinction. His DAISY (Digital Acoustic Imaging System) was the world’s first high-resolution, broadband, dynamically focused sonar. This technology was subsequently licensed to a major defense contractor.

Anticipating market needs is something that KNUDSEN has been doing for a long time. Judith recalls, “When KNUDSEN arrived on the scene of a well-established survey market with entrenched competition, we immediately recognized that we would have to offer something new, and that was technology. So, we became one of the early pioneers of DSP technology, and this gave us a key advantage in a market where most of the competition was still based on analog hardware. We decided that our customers would prefer to buy from an innovative leader in the field.”

A Little About Where We Are.

KNUDSEN is located in historic Perth, Ontario – close to Ottawa, Canada’s capital, and also to the many nearby lakes and rivers that act as the company’s test and customer training sites. Incorporated in 1981 by the husband and wife team of Donald and Judith Knudsen, the company has grown steadily over the years from an engineering-driven R&D enterprise into a market leader, exporting over 90% of its production, with over 400 installations worldwide.

KNUDSEN has established world recognition for its variety of flexible products designed to address a basic common end-user requirement to accurately measure the water depth from under numerous floating platforms (including small water craft, large ocean vessels, fleet and patrol vessels, surface and underwater remotely controlled and autonomous vehicles (ROV's/AUV's), and recently even submarines) to the sea bottom. Requirements for this accurate depth information are shared by a multitude of end-user requirements including hydrographic survey & mapping, pre/post dredging survey, ship navigation, oceanographic research, and sub-bottom profiling of the sea bottom sediment layers.

Quality Policy

"Knudsen Engineering Limited will be seen as a technology leader in acoustic marine equipment with a mission to meet all customer and applicable legal requirements. Through ongoing analysis, and continual improvement of our Quality Management System, Knudsen Engineering Limited will strive to set goals and objectives aimed at enhancing customer satisfaction."


Servings Per Container: About 4, 1/2 cup (118g)

Calories: 2,000 2,500
Total Fat Less than 65g 80g
Saturated Fat Less than 20g 25g
Cholesterol Less than 300mg 300mg
Sodium Less than 2,400mg 2,400mg
Total Carbohydrate 300g 375g
Dietary Fiber 25g 30g

*Nutrition information is estimated based on the ingredients and cooking instructions as described in each recipe and is intended to be used for informational purposes only. Please note that nutrition details may vary based on methods of preparation, origin and freshness of ingredients used.


What Knudsen family records will you find?

There are 32,000 census records available for the last name Knudsen. Like a window into their day-to-day life, Knudsen census records can tell you where and how your ancestors worked, their level of education, veteran status, and more.

There are 37,000 immigration records available for the last name Knudsen. Passenger lists are your ticket to knowing when your ancestors arrived in the USA, and how they made the journey - from the ship name to ports of arrival and departure.

There are 7,000 military records available for the last name Knudsen. For the veterans among your Knudsen ancestors, military collections provide insights into where and when they served, and even physical descriptions.

There are 32,000 census records available for the last name Knudsen. Like a window into their day-to-day life, Knudsen census records can tell you where and how your ancestors worked, their level of education, veteran status, and more.

There are 37,000 immigration records available for the last name Knudsen. Passenger lists are your ticket to knowing when your ancestors arrived in the USA, and how they made the journey - from the ship name to ports of arrival and departure.

There are 7,000 military records available for the last name Knudsen. For the veterans among your Knudsen ancestors, military collections provide insights into where and when they served, and even physical descriptions.


Alfred G. Knudson Jr., MD, PhD

Alfred G. Knudson, Jr., MD, PhD A geneticist and physician, Dr. Knudson (August 9, 1922 – July 10, 2016) was internationally recognized for his "two-hit" theory of cancer causation, which explained the relationship between the hereditary and non-hereditary forms of a cancer and predicted the existence of tumor-suppressor genes that can suppress cancer cell growth. This now-confirmed theory has advanced understanding of errors in the genetic program that turn normal cells into cancer cells.

Distinguished Awards

Awards and Honors

2013
Inaugural Fellow of the AACR Academy

2011
Made Honorary Member, AACR

2005
28th Annual Bristol-Myers Squibb Freedom to Discover™ Award for Distinguished Achievement in Cancer Research American Association for Cancer Research Lifetime Achievement Award

2005
28th Annual Bristol-Myers Squibb Freedom to Discover™ Award for Distinguished Achievement in Cancer Research American Association for Cancer Research Lifetime Achievement Award

2004
The editors of Genes, Chromosomes, & Cancer devoted an entire issue of their journal to Alfred G. Knudson. This is the first time that an issue of the journal has been devoted to the work of a single individual.
11th recipient of Fox Chase Cancer Center's Reimann Honor Award
Guest of Honor: XI International Congress of Ocular Oncology, Hyderabad, India

2002
Fox Chase Cancer Center's 14th annual Wick R. Williams Memorial Award.
American Society of Clinical Oncology 2002 Special Award and Pediatric Oncology Lectureship

2000
Lila Gruber Memorial Cancer Research Award, the American Academy of Dermatology

1999
Distinguished Career Award of the American Society of Hematology/Oncology
John Scott Award from the City of Philadelphia

1998
Albert Lasker Award for Clinical Medical Research

1997
Gairdner Foundation International Award, Canada Karnofsky Memorial Lecture Award, American Society of Clinical Oncology

1996
Robert J. and Claire Pasarow Foundation Award Durham City of Medicine Award

1995
M. D. Anderson Cancer Center Bertner Award Charles Rodolphe Brupbacher Foundation Award, Switzerland

1990
Founders' Award of the Chemical Industry Institute for Toxicology the American Radium Society's Janeway Medal Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center's Katharine Berkan Judd Award

1989
American Cancer Society's 1989 Medal of Honor

1988
Charles S. Mott Prize of the General Motors Cancer Research Foundation

Among Knudson's many professional distinctions, he received the 2004 Kyoto Prize, considered among the world's leading awards for lifetime achievement. He also earned the 1998 Albert Lasker Award for Clinical Medical Research, one of seven Lasker Awards presented that year. Considered "America's Nobels," Lasker Awards rank among the highest recognition for careers of distinguished work because of the extremely rigorous process of nomination and selection conducted by a jury of the world's top scientists.

In 1999, Knudson received the Distinguished Career Award of the American Society of Hematology/Oncology and the international John Scott Award from the City of Philadelphia. In 2000, the American Academy of Dermatology honored him with its Lila Gruber Memorial Cancer Research Award for researchers whose lifetime contributions have been outstanding in importance and distinction.

In September 2002, Knudson received Fox Chase Cancer Center's 14th annual Wick R. Williams Memorial Award. The American Society of Clinical Oncology also honored him with its 2002 Special Award in the form of a Pediatric Oncology Lectureship recognizing individuals who are accomplished in pediatric oncology.

In addition, Knudson has received the 1988 Charles S. Mott Prize of the General Motors Cancer Research Foundation the American Cancer Society's 1989 Medal of Honor the 1990 Founders' Award of the Chemical Industry Institute for Toxicology the American Radium Society's 1990 Janeway Medal Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center's 1990 Katharine Berkan Judd Award the 1991 William Allan Memorial Award of the American Society of Human Genetics M. D. Anderson Cancer Center's 1995 Bertner Award Switzerland's 1995 Charles Rodolphe Brupbacher Foundation Award the 1996 Robert J. and Claire Pasarow Foundation Award the 1996 Durham City of Medicine Award Canada's 1997 Gairdner Foundation International Award and the American Society of Clinical Oncology's 1997 Karnofsky Memorial Lecture Award.

Knudson's Background and Education

Born in Los Angeles in 1922, Knudson received his BS from California Institute of Technology in 1944, his MD from Columbia University in 1947 and his PhD from California Institute of Technology in 1956. He held a Guggenheim fellowship from 1953 to 1954.

Knudson came to Fox Chase from the University of Texas Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, where he was dean, and the M.D. Anderson Hospital and Tumor Institute in Houston, Texas, where he specialized in pediatrics and biology. Previously, he was associate dean for basic sciences at the State University of New York at Stony Brook from 1966 to 1969. He began his affiliation with Fox Chase in 1970 as a member of its scientific advisory committee before joining the Center staff in 1976.

Knudson and his wife, Anna T. Meadows, MD, a pediatric oncologist at Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, collaborated on the study of the genetics of childhood cancer.

Career Highlights

Dr. Knudson became an honorary member of the American Association for Cancer Research (AACR) in 2011, and an inaugural Fellow of the AACR Academy in March 2013.

In honor of his contributions to biomedical science, Knudson has been elected to the National Academy of Sciences and was named a Fox Chase Distinguished Scientist and senior advisor to the president in 1992. He was instrumental as a leader of Fox Chase's molecular oncology program from 1989 to 1999. Previously, Knudson served as director of Fox Chase's Institute for Cancer Research from 1976 until 1982, Center president from 1980 to 1982 and scientific director from 1982 to 1983.

In 1995, Knudson was appointed as special advisor to Dr. Richard Klausner, then director of the National Cancer Institute. While continuing his work at Fox Chase, Knudson also worked closely with Dr. Joseph Fraumeni in NCI's Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics. Knudson served as acting director of its human genetics program until September 1999, when he returned to Fox Chase full-time.


Chrysler&aposs secret contributions to the A-bomb 

The atomic bomb, code-named &aposLittle Boy,&apos as it is hoisted into the bomb bay of the Enola Gay.

Pedestrians moving past 1525 Woodward Avenue in Detroit in 1943 might have noticed something odd about the place𠅊n inordinate amount of security surrounding the first floor of an abandoned department store. In fact, something very curious was going on inside. Chrysler engineers had set up offices for something called Project X-100, and FBI agents were patrolling the premises, as the work was so top secret, none of the engineers working on the project had any knowledge of what it was all about.

Only the top executives at Chrysler knew that the company was helping to build the atomic bomb.

“To laymen, the thing [the Manhattan Project] sounded almost incredibly fantastic,” according to Chrysler’s 1947 official history of its bomb work, entitled Secret. 𠇋ut if the United States Government thought it practicable, this, [Chrysler CEO] Mr. Keller said, was all that the Corporation needed to know.”

At this laboratory on Woodward Avenue, Chrysler engineers designed diffusers𠅌ylindrical metal containers—that would not corrode during the process of separating fissile uranium-235 from uranium-238, at the Army’s secret Oak Ridge atomic plant in Tennessee. By 1944, thousands of workers at Chrysler’s Lynch Road factory were at work building 3,500 of these diffusers. According to the Atomic Heritage Foundation, these diffusers were so well-designed, they were not only instrumental in building the Little Boy bomb used on Hiroshima, they remained in use until the 1980s.


Watch the video: REVEALUTION the film - Official Trailer